Plant Health Management Defined

Plant health management is the science and practice of understanding and eliminating the succession of biotic and abiotic factors that limit plants from achieving their full genetic potential as crops, ornamentals, timber trees, or other uses. Although practiced as long as agriculture itself, as a science-based concept, plant heath management as a science is even younger than integrated pest management (IPM), and includes and builds upon but is broader than IPM. […] → Continue Reading Plant Health Management Defined

What are Genetically Engineered (GE) Crops and is Food From These Crops Safe?

Answers to Questions from a Journalist The rate of adoption of genetically engineered crops by farmers once approved by the federal government has been as fast or faster than the rate of adoption of new smartphones, apps, and GPS by the general public, and for the same reasons: these modern technologies bring value and convenience […] → Continue Reading What are Genetically Engineered (GE) Crops and is Food From These Crops Safe?

Soil Solarization (Solar Heating)

Read about a method to eliminate pathogens, weed seeds, and other pests from soil using the heat generated by the sun’s rays passing through clear plastic tarp covering the soil. […] → Continue Reading Soil Solarization (Solar Heating)

Toxic Straw or Root Disease: Allelopathy Overrated

Read about the depressed yields of wheat in conservation tillage systems misdiagnosed and researched for 30 years as allelopathy caused by toxins in the straw that turned out to be infectious root diseases due to lack of crop rotation. […] → Continue Reading Toxic Straw or Root Disease: Allelopathy Overrated

First Field Test in the U.S. Pacific Northwest with a Genetically Modified Organism

Read how the tools of rDNA technology, also known as “genetic engineering,” have been used in the past to reveal useful information about plant diseases and new approaches to their control. […] → Continue Reading First Field Test in the U.S. Pacific Northwest with a Genetically Modified Organism

The Rest of the Story: Take-all Decline with Continuous Wheat Monoculture

Crop rotation will always be the surest way to control root diseases, but continuous crop monoculture can also bring about the control of some root diseases. Read about the remarkable story of take-all decline with continuous monoculture of wheat. […] → Continue Reading The Rest of the Story: Take-all Decline with Continuous Wheat Monoculture

Contributions of Plant Pathology to the Life Sciences

Summary of a Symposium Talk Presented at the Centennial Meeting of the American Phytopathological Society, 2008, in Minneapolis, MN. […] → Continue Reading Contributions of Plant Pathology to the Life Sciences

The What and Why of the Paired-Row Effect on Yields of Cereals

Learn about experiments showing that cereal grains when under pressure from root disease yield more when planted in paired rows spaced 7 inches apart, with 17 inches between the pairs, rather than rows spaced uniformly at 12 inches apart; and that placement of fertilizer as a band needs to be close enough to the seed row so that even diseased roots can access to the nutrients. […] → Continue Reading The What and Why of the Paired-Row Effect on Yields of Cereals

Root Diseases of Wheat and Barley: What do they look like and what do they do to the crop?

Learn about four widely distributed root diseases of wheat and barley, how they are similar, how they are different and how they impact health and yield of the crop. […] → Continue Reading Root Diseases of Wheat and Barley: What do they look like and what do they do to the crop?

Why the Increased Growth and Yield Response of Crops to Soil Fumigation?

Learn about the research that experimentally separated the flush of nutrients from killed microbial biomass from control of root pathogens in explaining the nearly-universal increased growth and yield response of wheat to soil fumigation. […] → Continue Reading Why the Increased Growth and Yield Response of Crops to Soil Fumigation?